Do you use Vampire Energy?

Do you use Vampire Energy?

As taxed as air conditioners were this summer, running up electric bills across the country, there's something else Americans now need to pay attention to year-round.
As taxed as air conditioners were this summer, running up electric bills across the country, there's something else Americans now need to pay attention to year-round.

Only if they're interested in cutting energy costs.

By all accounts, Americans continued to be vigilant controlling cooling costs this summer.

However, consumer experts say there's still more to do to reduce what's called Vampire Energy.

That's wasted energy when something's left on, even when not in use.

"From your smartphones to your DVD players, to your X-Box and television sets, there are so many gadgets consuming electricity," said Consumer Savings Expert Andrea Woroch.

A phone charger, plugged in, but not charging is Vampire Energy.

But an even bigger waste of energy, according to consumer savings expert Woroch is found near your television set.

"Cable boxes use so much energy, they're growing to become one of the biggest energy consuming gadgets in your home," said Woroch.

So, she says, as impractical as it may sound, cut the cable box off when you're away, even if just for the day.

"A cable box uses the same amount of energy in the off-mode than it does while it's on," said Woroch.

Better yet, switch off the power strip, the cable box, tv and other electronics that are plugged in.

Definitely do it when away for an extended period of time.

Also, reset your thermostat and the temperature on the hot water heater.

"Definitely turn it to its lowest setting or completely off and that'll really help you cut costs there as well," said Woroch.

In fact, she says most American households can live with 120 degree hot water, instead of the 140 degrees set by most manufacturers.
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