President calls for plan of action against ISIS

President calls for plan of action against ISIS

President Obama summoned his national security council to the White House, as the fight against the terror group ISIS reaches a critical decision point.
President Obama summoned his national security council to the White House, as the fight against the terror group ISIS reaches a critical decision point.
To defeat ISIS, the president will be forced to make a difficult decision -- whether to expand U.S. air strikes from Iraq into Syria.
Under pressure to take the fight to ISIS terrorists on their home turf in Syria, President Obama declared bombs alone won't win the fight.
"The violence that's been taking place in Syria has obviously given ISIL a safe haven there in ungoverned spaces, and in order for us to degrade ISIL over the long term, we're going to have to build a regional strategy. Now, we're not going to do that alone," says the president.
Defeating the terror army will require strikes on its home base in Syria.
The United Nations says the on-going war in Syria has given way to a lawless bloodbath.
The U.N.'s Assistant Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs Kyung-wha Kang says "in the face of impunity, grave human rights violations have become the norm in Syria."
Douglas McCain is believed to be the first American to die while fighting for ISIS in Syria.
The F.B.I. refuses to comment on reports another Minnesota native was killed in the same battle.
McCain's best friend and Minneapolis-area high school classmate, Troy Kastigar, died five years ago while fighting for an al Qaeda affiliate in Somalia.
Community activist Omar Jamal says "the kids are being recruited from major cities in this country: Chicago, Minneapolis, New York." This Somali-American community activist from McCain's hometown says recruiters are speaking to disaffected youth with devastating effect using social media. "The U.S is losing the war on the propaganda," says Jamal. 
An enemy recruits fighters here at home, as President Obama looks for ways to fight them overseas.
Brian Mooar, NBC News.
Washington, D.C.
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