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Electronics in flight

The FAA has determined that all airlines can safely expand passenger use of Portable Electronic Devices during all phases of flight. Steve Handelsman has this report.
The FAA has determined that all airlines can safely expand passenger use of Portable Electronic Devices during all phases of flight.  Steve Handelsman has this report.

You still can't make cellphone calls while you fly, but the Federal Aviation Administration today, is changing a long standing rule: allowing the use of personal electronic device aboard airliners, period.

No more having to switch off when the door gets shut.

No more flight attendants badgering you.

The FAA change allows you to use your pad, your pod, your kindle, your smartphone the whole time you're on the plane.

"Play games listen to music that kind of thing," said passenger Emily Hurst.

Remember when actor Alec Baldwin got kicked off a fight for refusing to turn off his phone?

Well, soon, he wouldn't be.

In our ever-more-connected world airlines looking to make flyers want to fly more urged the FAA to allow the change

"The committee determined that most commercial airplanes can tolerate radio interference from portable electronic devices, it's safe to read downloaded materials like ebooks, calendars and also to play games," said FAA Administrator Michael Huerta.

Heavy devices like laptops still need to be stowed for takeoff and we're still supposed to stop and pay attention to the safety briefing.

Using cell service, to make calls or text or surf the web is still banned.

Airline mode required.

But that might change soon.

"I think if you talk to most people in the airline industry they will tell you that (see him here??) They really do not think that cellphones interfere with the electronics in the cockpit. That said, the faa is going to take a better safe than sorry approach, at least for now," said CNBC's Phil LeBeau.

But the FAA says it is safe to use offline electronic devices and airlines say they'll move quickly to loosen their rules.

No one is happier about that than flight attendants whose union said, they're tired of feeling like hall monitors.

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