New $100 bills help local businesses tell the real from the fake

New $100 bills help local businesses tell the real from the fake

Your money is getting a makeover. New security features are on newly designed $100 bills to help fight fraud.

Holograms and hidden words are both part of the new look for the $100 bill.

The Federal Reserve released the new design on Tuesday, hoping to curb counterfeiting.

"Well, with the technology nowadays, the color copiers and  the micro-printing and stuff,  some of them are very difficult to tell whether it is a legitiment note or a counterfeit note," says Detective Matthew Bragg.

Detective Bragg works with the Bossier Financial Crimes Task Force.

So far this year, the team has worked up to 120 cases where people have either successfully passed counterfeit notes or have attempted to.

"Well in the longrun, these new bills will help convenience stores, register operators from all the different stores from walmart, to your local mom and pop stores," says Det. Bragg. "They'll be able to look at the bill and immediately detect whether it's a real note or counterfeit note."

Right down the middle of the new $100 bill, there's a blue, 3D security ribbon.

Near the bottom, you'll see a hologram of the liberty bell.

The bill also has a quill representing the signing of the Declaration of Independence.

"I think it would be a lot better for restaurants and people who deal with lots of cash all the time," says Fumblebrewski's Service Manager Stephanie Entwistle.

Working at a bar, Entwistle puts her fingers on thousands of dollars a day.

That's why she's happy with Ben Franklin's new cosmetic work.

"I think it would be definitely much easier to identify a counterfeit bill now that the bills are out, because there are so many security features on it," says Entwistle. "I don't think it can be duplicated."

And that's the very idea the U.S. Mint was trying to achieve.

You may be wondering, what about the old $100 bills?

The Federal Reserve Board says they'll keep them in circulation instead of having banks trade them in for the new ones.

Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus