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Secretary of State makes case for military action against Syria

Secretary of State John Kerry declared Friday that the U.S. had a moral obligation to punish Syria for using chemical weapons, painting a ghastly portrait of twitching bodies, victims foaming at the mouth and row upon row of children gassed to death, but Danielle Leight reports that a poll finds majority of Americans are opposed.
Secretary of State John Kerry declared Friday that the U.S. had a moral obligation to punish Syria for using chemical weapons, painting a ghastly portrait of twitching bodies, victims foaming at the mouth and row upon row of children gassed to death, but  Danielle Leight reports that a poll finds majority of Americans are opposed. 

President Obama is asking the American people for support, as he moves closer to waging an attack on Syria.

This afternoon the administration revealed the evidence that led it to conclude the Assad regime was behind last week's chemical attack.

Speaking to reporters, President Obama promised he won't send troops into Syria but he is considering a limited attack.

"The world has an obligation to make sure we maintain the norm against the use of chemical weapons," said Mr. Obama.

Secretary of State John Kerry revealed unclassified intelligence just hours earlier.

Kerry says evidence indicating that the Syrian regime prepared for last week's chemical attack for days and that the attacks targeted congested neighborhoods after being launched from areas controlled by Assad.

According to Kerry, those attacks killed more than 1,4000 people.

"This is the indiscriminate. This is what Assad did to his own people," the Secretary of State said.

A growing bi-partisan group of lawmakers is demanding President Obama seek their approval before taking action.

"The President can and should call us into a joint session, we can be here within 24 hours," said republican Congressman Scott Rigell of Virginia.

A new NBC poll shows half of Americans oppose taking military action and lawmakers are also hesitant.

"I do not want America to head into another war," said Congressman Dick Durbin a democrat from Illinois.

There are tough decisions ahead as the White House weighs its options.

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