East Texas man charged in Capitol riot files motion to remove GPS monitoring while he’s on bond

Crime

Alex Harkrider (left) and Ryan Nichols (right) in a photo at the Capitol Riot taken from a Facebook post from Nichols. (Photo via The Justice Department)

WASHINGTON (KETK) – A Carthage man charged in the January riot at the U.S. Capitol filed a motion on Wednesday through his attorney to remove ankle GPS monitoring as a condition of his bond.

34-year-old Alex Harkrider was released on bond two months ago until his trial. He is charged along with 30-year-old Ryan Nichols, a Longview resident, of several crimes stemming from the riot ranging from civil disorder to assaulting federal officers.

Kira West, Harkrider’s attorney in D.C., wrote that Judge Thomas Hogan had initial reservations about Harkrider’s “ability to follow the orders of the Court or any other government agency.”

The three-page motion states that the 24/7 monitoring costs Harkrider roughly $110 a month. It also says that Luke Salcedo, Harkrider’s pre-trial officer, urged West to file the motion saying that he was “completely compliant.”

“According to Mr. Salcedo, he can effectively supervise, monitor, and report compliance on Mr. Harkrider just as effectively without the electronic location monitoring.”

Motion filed by alex harkrider’s attorney

In the motion back in March that petitioned for Harkrider to be released on bond, his lawyers claimed that the Capitol had already been breached by the time Harkrider reached the building and that he “never damaged federal property, never threatened law enforcement.

However, in the affidavit, there are screenshots of video from the FBI where they alleged that both Nichols and Harkrider were “pushing with the large crowd against the same entrance to the U.S. Capitol that was guarded by U.S. Capitol Police.

A separate photo from Snapchat that was included in the arrest warrant showed Harkrider inside the Capitol with a caption that read: “We’re in. 2 people killed already. We need all the patriots of this country to rally the f*** up and fight for our freedom or it’s gone forever. Give us liberty or give us death.”

His lawyers claim, without evidence, that the photo “could be easily doctored.” and that the detective “had no idea how the writing got on the photo.”

Judge Hogan was nominated by President Regan and is now presiding over the case after initially being assigned to Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson.

She was recently confirmed by the Senate to the D.C. Court of Appeals and is a likely pick for a Supreme Court vacancy by President Biden.

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