Tomorrow Lows
Tomorrow Highs

Yes, indeed, our pesky upper-level high pressure is still anchored in the desert Southwest. In addition, it extends right across the Arklatex. This has led to increased afternoon high temperatures and very muggy morning lows. But, there is a weakness in this high pressure that could lead to a bit cooler afternoon temperatures, although still hot. Afternoon highs as we start the new week will be in the mid to upper 90s. Morning lows should be in the mid to upper 70s.

Current Radar
FUTURECAST

Rain chances will continue to be quite slim, with only sea-breeze activity possible for the southeastern part of our area. In addition, heat index levels may be high enough to warrant heat advisories. On a more uplifting note, a weak cold front should enter the area by late this week. Thursday should find scattered rain and storms which will become more widespread as we go into Friday. By Saturday, rain and storms could become likely.

Drought Monitor
& Day Forecast

If this comes about, it could be a chance to make a dent in our drought while dropping our afternoon highs into the low to mid-90s. In addition, there may be more rain chances in the following week, the first week of August, near the end of Dog Days Of Summer. But where did that name come from? Check this out:

Canis Major

The phrase is a reference to Sirius, the Dog Star. During the “Dog Days” period, the Sun occupies the same region of the sky as Sirius, the brightest star visible from any part of Earth. Sirius is a part of the constellation Canis Major, the Greater Dog. In the summer, Sirius rises and sets with the Sun. On July 23rd, specifically, it is in conjunction with the Sun, and because the star is so bright, the ancient Romans believed it actually gave off heat and added to the Sun’s warmth, accounting for the long stretch of sultry weather. They referred to this time as diēs caniculārēs, or “dog days. Thus, the term Dog Days of Summer came to mean the 20 days before and 20 days after this alignment of Sirius with the Sun—July 3 to August 11 each year.

Stay positive and hope this forecast comes to fruition.