Workplace bullying, violence tied to higher risk of heart problems, study finds

We've Got Your Back
181119-workplace-bullying-silhouette-ac-631p_dd75375bba3e3964c62e78ae3826ade4.fit-2000w_1553615491806.jpg

People who are bullied or exposed to violence on the job may be more likely to develop cardiovascular disease than individuals who don’t deal with these challenges at work, a European study suggests.

Researchers examined survey data from more than 79,000 working men and women between 19 and 65 years old who didn’t have a history of heart disease. Overall, about 9 percent of them reported being bullied and 13 percent said they had been exposed to violence on the job in the last year.

After an average follow-up period of more than 12 years, 3,229 people, or about 4 percent of the workers in the study, were diagnosed with heart disease or hospitalized for related events like a heart attack or stroke.

Click here for more. 

Copyright 2019 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Did You Know?

  1. More than one out of every five (20.8%) students report being bullied (National Center for Educational Statistics, 2016).
  2. 33% of students who reported being bullied at school indicated that they were bullied at least once or twice a month during the school year (National Center for Educational Statistics, 2016).
  3. Of those students who reported being bullied, 13% were made fun of, called names, or insulted; 12% were the subject of rumors; 5% were pushed, shoved, tripped, or spit on; and 5% were excluded from activities on purpose (National Center for Educational Statistics, 2016).
  4. Students who experience bullying are at increased risk for poor school adjustment, sleep difficulties, anxiety, and depression (Center for Disease Control, 2015).
  5. Students who experience bullying are twice as likely as non-bullied peers to experience negative health effects such as headaches and stomachaches (Gini & Pozzoli, 2013).

(Data provided by Pacer's National Bullying Prevention Center. Visit their website to see more bullying statistics.)

Don't Miss

Stay Connected – Stay Connected